Tuesday, June 15, 2010

The Sarben to Keystone Road

After anywhere from six inches to a foot of rain in the past week depending on the area, we have been advised not to travel on any country roads in western Lincoln County until the roads department has a chance to make sure that they're safe. No sense in going out and making matters worse.

However, BEFORE that order came out, we took a break from the first of the NEBRASKAland DAYS events to do a quick road trip. Since we didn't have time for anything major, we decided to skirt the Platte River valley on the Sarben to Keystone road. As you can see, this is definitely open range country.
The Sandhill bluffs break down into the Platte River valley in beautiful canyons. Nebraskas large cities may be in the east, but none of them have a skyline to match the one in this picture.
Needless to say, this sign isn't an understatement!
Further on, a few horses graze in the lush grass of the valley, with the Union Pacific branch line tracks in the background. This line goes up to the coal country of Wyoming and sees many trains each day.
Our final destination on this journey is the small town of Keystone. It is picturesque and quaint, but even here in the quiet outback of Nebraska, modern technology is readily available as seen by the sign advertising high speed Internet beneath the historic Standard Oil sign.
Main Street in Keystone. There's a post office, bank, library and telephone exchange, but I didn't see any place to purchase anything.
Here is Keystones claim to fame. The little church, dedicated in 1916 that serves both Protestant and Catholic congregations. The Catholic altar is at one end and the Protestant altar at the other. The pews have moveable backs so the worshippers can face either direction. I believe it is the only one of its kind in existence.
Unfortunately, but probably necessary, the church doesn't put out the welcome mat for visitors. Even more unfortunate, there wasn't any sign indicating who to call to arrange for a glance inside, or if the church was ever open to visitors. I might suggest a visit to the Keith County Convention and Visitors Bureau website for more information.
As we left the valley, we were reminded that even with the abundance (should I say over abundance?) of rain we have received recently, Nebraska is always in need of water.
Thanks for stopping by for this brief trip through some beautiful Nebraska country. The coffee is always on for visitors.

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